Roaches

Roaches

German Cockroach: It is a small cockroach, adults are about 1/2 – 5/8 inch long, light brown to tan body, with two distinctive longitudinal stripes just behind its head. The German cockroach requires moisture regularly, has a high reproductive rate and is small enough to live in small cracks and crevices. Infestations are often at their worst in the late summer months. Because cockroaches tend to frequent garbage cans, sewers and other disease-laden locations, germs attach to their body that can transfer to food contact surfaces (utensils, plates) during the normal course of roach activities.

Oriental Cockroach: Adult Oriental cockroaches are about one inch in length. Both male and female adults area  very dark brown, nearly black; their bodies usually have a somewhat greasy sheen. Females have small, functionless, rudimentary wing pads and broader, heavier bodies. Males have wings that cover only about three-quarters of their abdomen. Males are apparently unable to fly. Oriental cockroaches are often called water bugs because of their preference for dark, damp, and cool areas such as those under sinks and washing machines, and in damp basements. This species, which is less wary and more sluggish than the others, is of concern because it often travels through sewer pipes and lives on filth.

American Cockroach: Adults are about 1 3/8 – 2 1/8 inch long, and are reddish brown to pale brown in color, with a yellowish band around the edge of the pronotal shield. American cockroaches are found in moist shady areas outdoors, in yards, hollow trees, wood piles, and mulch. They are occasionally found under roof shingles and in attics. The cockroaches dwell outside but will wander indoors for food and water or during extremes in weather conditions. They migrate by crawling or flying into structures often entering houses and apartments from sewers via the plumbing, by trees and shrubs located alongside buildings or trees with branches overhanging roofs facilitate the entry of cockroaches into the home. During the day the American cockroach, which responds negatively to light, rests in harborages close to water pipes, sinks, baths, and toilets, for example, where the microclimate is suitable for survival.

General Roach Information >